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Thursday, September 1, 2011

Measuring the impact energy of highly charged ions





(PhysOrg.com) -- Much like a meteor impacting a planet, highly charged ions hit really hard and can do a lot of damage, albeit on a much smaller scale. And much like geologists determine the size and speed of the meteor by looking at the hole it left, physicists can learn a lot about a highly charged ion's energy by looking at the divots it makes in thin films.
Measuring the impact energy of highly charged ions
A schematic detailing the various ways that the energy of highly charged ions is dissipated during an impact. Approximately 60 percent of the ion’s energy is blown back and, according to NIST measurements, 27 percent of the remaining 40 percent goes into deforming the material—making a crater or “divot”. Credit: NIST
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